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    ATRIUM.TALKS: MAXIMISING YOUR MARKET IN BRUSSELS


    ATRIUM.TALKS: MAXIMISING YOUR MARKET IN BRUSSELS

    –  june 1 2017 –

    More than nine municipal markets are held daily in Brussels, almost three times as many as 50 years ago. How can you capitalise on this popularity? Atrium.Brussels invites you to visit on Tuesday 27 June, from 09:00 onwards, so you can fill your basket with the many opportunities offered by Brussels markets!

    Social links under every awning

    Markets are much more than a simple forum for commercial transactions: they are also the perfect place for meeting and forging social links. And the inextricable link between local markets and sedentary urban trade encouraged Atrium.Brussels to undertake a comprehensive study to better understand the conditions of emergence, and the nature and effects of markets on their environment.

    Furthermore, markets are the ideal place to try out new business ideas, promoting customer experience. Thus, exotic cooked dishes and products were first sold in markets, in the form of tasting stands. The food trucks that you see almost everywhere now also had their beginnings in the marketplace, as did the rotisserie several years earlier.

    The laws of the market, overlooked and fluid

    Real urban choreography, the market follows a set of visible and invisible rules: the fruit and vegetable seller, always at the centre, since he arrives first and leaves last; so-called basic products in a central location, occasional purchases at the end of the market, and so on.

    There are many laws that determine the success of a market. In many cases, organisers have little knowledge of the markets for which they themselves are responsible.

    Similarly, significant variations may emerge, depending on the district in which the market is located, or depending on the type of market within a single district…

    I market, you market, he, she or it markets…?

    The first part of this guide looks at markets in Brussels from a historical, geographic, socioeconomic and legislative perspective. It also reveals opportunities that these markets may offer in terms of innovation, tourism and sustainable development.

    The second part, in the format of a good practice guide, offers a series of specific measures for people wishing to revitalise or (re)launch a market in Brussels.

    The field analysis performed by Atrium.Brussels, and this organisation’s experience with a range of regional projects (such as Cook & Market) provided the initial inspiration for this. The involvement of the Brussels Minister for the Economy and Employment, Didier Gosuin, the Saint-Gilles Alderman for Business Patrick Debouverie, Olivier Marette of Visit.Brussels,… are illustrations of these measures.

    Ready to go shopping?


    ATRIUM.TALKS: MAXIMISING YOUR MARKET IN BRUSSELS

    –  june 1 2017 –

    More than nine municipal markets are held daily in Brussels, almost three times as many as 50 years ago. How can you capitalise on this popularity? Atrium.Brussels invites you to visit on Tuesday 27 June, from 09:00 onwards, so you can fill your basket with the many opportunities offered by Brussels markets!

    Social links under every awning

    Markets are much more than a simple forum for commercial transactions: they are also the perfect place for meeting and forging social links. And the inextricable link between local markets and sedentary urban trade encouraged Atrium.Brussels to undertake a comprehensive study to better understand the conditions of emergence, and the nature and effects of markets on their environment.

    Furthermore, markets are the ideal place to try out new business ideas, promoting customer experience. Thus, exotic cooked dishes and products were first sold in markets, in the form of tasting stands. The food trucks that you see almost everywhere now also had their beginnings in the marketplace, as did the rotisserie several years earlier.

    The laws of the market, overlooked and fluid

    Real urban choreography, the market follows a set of visible and invisible rules: the fruit and vegetable seller, always at the centre, since he arrives first and leaves last; so-called basic products in a central location, occasional purchases at the end of the market, and so on.

    There are many laws that determine the success of a market. In many cases, organisers have little knowledge of the markets for which they themselves are responsible.

    Similarly, significant variations may emerge, depending on the district in which the market is located, or depending on the type of market within a single district…

    I market, you market, he, she or it markets…?

    The first part of this guide looks at markets in Brussels from a historical, geographic, socioeconomic and legislative perspective. It also reveals opportunities that these markets may offer in terms of innovation, tourism and sustainable development.

    The second part, in the format of a good practice guide, offers a series of specific measures for people wishing to revitalise or (re)launch a market in Brussels.

    The field analysis performed by Atrium.Brussels, and this organisation’s experience with a range of regional projects (such as Cook & Market) provided the initial inspiration for this. The involvement of the Brussels Minister for the Economy and Employment, Didier Gosuin, the Saint-Gilles Alderman for Business Patrick Debouverie, Olivier Marette of Visit.Brussels,… are illustrations of these measures.

    Ready to go shopping?

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